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“New York City Implements Curfew to Ensure Safety at 20 Shelters for Asylum Seekers”

Around 3,600 migrants residing in 20 shelters will be subjected to new curfew regulations starting Monday in New York City.

Under the updated rules, migrants will not be permitted to enter or exit the shelters between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. The rationale behind selecting these specific shelters for the curfew remains unclear, but it may be linked to the volume of occupants, primarily consisting of individuals in smaller hotels.

While the curfew policy is already in effect in larger migrant shelters and is a common practice in various homeless shelters, New York City Hall asserts that the curfew is in place to enhance the health and safety of the migrants under the city’s care, as well as to benefit neighboring communities.

A statement from New York City Hall mentions that the curfews are being implemented at smaller sites managed by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) “to allow for more efficient capacity management for migrants in the city’s care.”

However, concerns linger regarding migrant safety, particularly following the recent arrests of Venezuelan migrants that occurred before 11 p.m. in the last few weeks.

Interviews with impacted migrants reveal a generally accepting attitude toward the new curfew, as long as those with work commitments can remain out past 11 p.m., which they can. Many migrants, especially those with young children, express that they are usually asleep by 11 p.m. if they are not working, minimizing the impact of the new policy on their daily routines.

Residents near one of the small hotels housing migrants in Hell’s Kitchen on West 46th Street report no issues related to migrant safety. Some residents even voice concerns for the migrants’ safety, given the area’s usual nightlife traffic, which includes noise, drinking, and partying from non-migrants.

In contrast to concerns, some residents welcome the migrants, emphasizing the nation’s immigrant roots and the positive contributions migrants make to the country.

Under the updated rules, migrants will not be permitted to enter or exit the shelters between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. The rationale behind selecting these specific shelters for the curfew remains unclear, but it may be linked to the volume of occupants, primarily consisting of individuals in smaller hotels.

While the curfew policy is already in effect in larger migrant shelters and is a common practice in various homeless shelters, New York City Hall asserts that the curfew is in place to enhance the health and safety of the migrants under the city’s care, as well as to benefit neighboring communities.

A statement from New York City Hall mentions that the curfews are being implemented at smaller sites managed by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) “to allow for more efficient capacity management for migrants in the city’s care.”

However, concerns linger regarding migrant safety, particularly following the recent arrests of Venezuelan migrants that occurred before 11 p.m. in the last few weeks.

Interviews with impacted migrants reveal a generally accepting attitude toward the new curfew, as long as those with work commitments can remain out past 11 p.m., which they can. Many migrants, especially those with young children, express that they are usually asleep by 11 p.m. if they are not working, minimizing the impact of the new policy on their daily routines.

Residents near one of the small hotels housing migrants in Hell’s Kitchen on West 46th Street report no issues related to migrant safety. Some residents even voice concerns for the migrants’ safety, given the area’s usual nightlife traffic, which includes noise, drinking, and partying from non-migrants.

In contrast to concerns, some residents welcome the migrants, emphasizing the nation’s immigrant roots and the positive contributions migrants make to the country.

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